WORLD SPARROW DAY

I was looking through my ‘Favourite Quote‘ folder for something suitable to pair with my recent Sparrow photos and could find nothing.

It was then I did some Googling and discovered there was such a thing as World Sparrow Day – on the 20th March.   I’ve just missed it but decided to share the images (without a quote) anyway.

The male House Sparrow below seems to be staring straight at me.   Could it see me sitting at my desk, camera in hand?   Who knows.  Probably not as the exterior windows had been cleaned recently and it was probably looking at its own reflection?

Next up are a couple of images of the smallest/youngest sparrow I think I’ve ever seen.

Note: These images were made directly through the louvred windows located on the right-hand side of my lounge and computer screen.   It’s been raining for a couple of days and will continue for the next 3-4 days so I can’t open the louvres wide to get a clear shot without the glass edges showing in the photo. I watched it for quite some time and felt some sort of connection with its vulnerability.

Next, a male, just after the bird quenched its thirst.

Then a female (with another young female waiting its turn to drink and bathe in the lower left).

…..and another male.

I’ve never been able to get close enough to these flighty birds as I did the Spotted Turtle-doves in my previous apartment balcony on the north-east side of the city (below).   These doves became so tame that I could (slowly) step onto the balcony and edge up to the birds and photograph them from only  12-18 inches away.   There was one dove with a feather tuft over its right eye that became so friendly I could almost hand-feed it (but not quite).

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Here are some more sparrows taking a bath in April 2020.   They’re highly amusing to watch as they splash and roll their heads around trying to wash and dry themselves in sequence.   I rarely have time to alter camera settings or try for a well-balanced composition.   Its a matter of shoot with the camera on ‘general’ settings with a relatively high ISO in case they go to the shady side of the birdbath(s).  Sometimes the autofocus stops short of the birds in favour of dirty dust patterns, but move the camera slightly and the autofocus can latch onto the bird’s head or eye.

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I’m so lucky to have their company on rainy or housebound days.  But I tend to devote far too much of the morning to their antics.

I love watching the birds.   They’re wonderful company.   They sing joyfully as I wake in the morning and very companionable when singing for a mate.

Here’s another shot from back when I still had my balcony garden set up.  I’d emptied the plant trough and stirred up the soil surface with a fork so that they could rummage around for some tasty titbits to eat.

 

Commensal with humans, sparrows inhabit most continents throughout the world. They were introduced to Australia in the 1860s by acclimatisation societies and are now abundant in cities, towns, rural areas and around farm buildings, particularly in the south-east of Australia.

 

6 thoughts on “WORLD SPARROW DAY

  1. I’ve always had a special fondness for sparrows. They are common, but can always be counted on to be around and keep their cheerfulness with them at all times. They have brightened my days many times when there were no other birds around.

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    1. I’m glad to hear the Sparrows have brightened your day(s) also, Terry. They’re ‘common as mud’ and yet, so unique when you study them for a while.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Sorry to hear your Sparrow numbers have declined – perhaps the larger birds of prey have increased, taking out the small bird populations? Come DownUnder to Australia. The Sparrows are almost in plague numbers. 🙂

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  2. I really enjoy the sparrows. Their constant chatter makes me smile — you can count on sparrows. Your photos are wonderful, and I did enjoy that tiny one. Sometimes the obvious vulnerability of creatures really is touching. Their ability to survive and even thrive is wonderful.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re right, Linda. You can definitely count on Sparrows.

      Hard to believe the millions in Australia all started from emigrating in 1860 (probably from the U.K.). Same with Blackbirds. They are not indigenous and probably came out in the 1800s too.

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